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2022

The AG Big-Byte: The Stake around a “Steak-less” Future

Each week, Asian Geographic's BIG-BYTE delves into the trends and issues that matters on the digital platform. This week, we look into the controversy...

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Travel and Adventure

Science

The Lungs of the Earth

The oceans are crucial to regulating climate and act as “the lungs of the Earth”, with algae and cyanobacteria in seawater providing up to 80 percent of the atmospheric oxygen which we rely on to breathe. The oceans also house over 230,000 marine species, with estimates that there are between one and 10 million species still undiscovered. Alongside their own intrinsic value, many of these marine species provide important goods and services. Collectively, ocean-related services and business are estimated to contribute over USD500 billion to the world’s economy.

Culture

Thailand’s Hill Tribes See Their Last Days

As elders pass on and youth surrender to the tide of modernisation, the once-proud villages who lived off the land are surrendering their diligently preserved traditions for basic food and healthcare

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East Meets West

Artist Yang Liu challenges the boundaries of art with her bold works and tongue-in-cheek perspectives on modernity and cultural difference. Presented in minimalistic spreads with striking colours, her crystal clear messages are a testament to the oppidan life and a comfort to all caught at the cultural crossroads of...

Salt

Photos and Text by Mohammad Rakibul Hasan A coastal community in Bangladesh battles salinity intrusion on the front line of climate change Global warming has had more severe an impact on certain countries than others. Bangladesh is one such country suffering the disproportionate effects of global warming; it is one of...

Before They are Silenced Forever

In Southeast Asia, songbirds are caught, caged and illegally traded. In true colonial fashion, humankind yearns to acquire that which he finds beautiful, but this tendency could silence nature's virtuousos forever.

In the Flesh: When a Child is Commodified

by Anna Malika, with Selina Tan. Additional Information: 3 Angels Nepal Deprived of the basic essentials for survival, children – viscerally afraid of an uncertain reality – can easily be led by the false promises of food, a decent wage, or even security and affection.Child sex trafficking is arguably...

Current Affairs

5 things you must know to kick off World Ozone Day this year

Today is World Ozone Day! In 1994, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 16 September the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer,...

Fighting a war: Afghanistan’s Army of Midwives

In Afghanistan, a woman dies every 27 minutes from pregnancy-related complications. At 6.5 percent (6,500 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births), the maternal mortality...

The Road to Independence: Burma (1945 – 1962)

From the 1962 Democracy Protests, through the 1974 U Thant Crisis, the 1988 Uprising, and the 2007 Saffron Revolution, to the 2021 Spring Revolution, Myanmar has fought against the whims of its military leaders and suffered at the hands of the army. To make sense of the tumultuous events of the past six decades, we must understand the complex politics and power struggles that have dominated this country once known as Burma.

Sea Change in the Strait

By Sarah Chew It is August 1965. Less than two years after a merger, Singapore’s reluctant departure from the Federation of Malaysia throws her into...

On Concerns Around Potential Amendments to the Shark Ban in the Maldives

Media statement by The Republic of Maldives’ Ministry of Fisheries, Marine Resources and Agriculture: Following serious concerns regarding the status of shark stocks in Maldivian...

Most Read

The Uniquely Southeast Asian Sport of Sepak Takraw

Sepak takraw may have been around since the 15th century, but it’s no forgotten relic. Find out more about the history of this fast-growing sport – and its bid for Olympic recognition

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