Asian Geographic Images of Asia Monthly Competition June 2021 Winners and Finalists

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Winners of Images of Asia Monthly Competition June 2021
From Left to Right, Top to Bottom: “The Innocent Face” by Chan Ee Lin [Malaysia]; “Taste of Purulia” by Sirsendu Gayen [India]; “Sign of Life” by Mohamad Hud Zaqwan [Malaysia]; and “Looking Out of the Emergency Window” by Chan Ee Lin [Malaysia]
The ASIAN Geographic’s Images of Asia (IOA) 2021 photography competition, exhibits the work of photographers from all across Asia. We have received stunning photos across the various categories, and here are the winners and finalists for June 2021!
Black+White Category

Black+White Category June 2021 Winner, taken in Indonesia by Chan Ee Lin from Malaysia, captioned, “The Innocent Face”

Black+White Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Selangor, Malaysia by Chen Chit Chuang from Malaysia, captioned, “Awal Muharram Celebration by the Rohingyas”

Black+White Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Agra, India by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Tourists at Taj Mahal”

Black+White Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in North Sulawesi Indonesia by Ayub Mooduto from Indonesia, captioned, “H.O.P.E”

Black+White Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Selangor, Malaysia by Mohamad Hud Zaqwan from Malaysia, captioned, “Old Wood, Old Net, Old Times”

Black+White Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Karnaphuli, India by Zon Hisham Bin Zainal Abidin from Malaysia, captioned, “Fishing Boats Resting on the Muddy Banks of Karnaphuli Chittagong, Bangladesh, on a Low Tide”

 


 

Landscape Category

Landscape Category June 2021 Winner, taken in Selangor, Malaysia by Mohamad Hud Zaqwan from Malaysia, captioned, “Sign of Life”

Landscape Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Taiping Malaysia by Wong Chee Shiuan from Malaysia, captioned, “Beautiful Lake”

Landscape Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Phalut, Darjeeling by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Light and Shadow”
Landscape Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Huangshan Mountain, China by Sinsee Ho from Malaysia, captioned, “Surreal Winter Beauty”

Landscape Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Bagan, Myanmar by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “End of the Day”

 


 

Food Category

Food Category June 2021 Winner, taken in Purulia, India by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Taste of Purulia”

Food Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Purulia, India by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Taste of Rural Bengal”

 

Street/People Category

Street/People Category June 2021 Winner, taken in India by Chan Ee Lin from Malaysia, captioned, “Looking Out of the Emergency Window”

Street/People Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Mandalay, Myanmar by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Traditional Myanmar Fishing Style”

Street/People Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Myanmar by Chen Chit Chuang from Malaysia, captioned, “Life at the Passageway”

Street/People Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in India by Chan Ee Lin from Malaysia, captioned, “A Mind Challenging Game with a Man’s Best Friend”

Street/People Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Varanasi, India by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Streets of Varanasi”

Street/People Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Jhargam, India by Sirsendu Gayen from India, captioned, “Child’s Play”

 


 

Wildlife Category

Wildlife Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Selangor, Malaysia by Mohamad Hud Zaqwan from Malaysia, captioned, “Dinner’s Early”

Wildlife Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Pasir Ris, Singapore by Nicholas Ng from Malaysia, captioned, “Give Me Back My Food”

 


 

Photo Journalism Category

Vote for your favourite photojournalism entry now on the official Asian Geographic’s Facebook and Instagram now!

PhotoJournalism Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Kashmir, India by Wong Chee Shiuan from Malaysia, captioned, “Eid Mubarak in Kashmir”

One may wonder how Jammu and Kashmir, a state which is predominantly Muslim, became part of India which is dominated by Hindus? British ruled the Indian subcontinent since 1858. After the second world war, the British are faced with increasing pressure from the Nationalist movement in the Indian subcontinent for independence. Britain decided to partition the subcontinent based on religions. Pakistan (Muslim majority) declared independence on 14/8/1947 and India (Hindu majority) a day later. The princely states in the subcontinent were given the liberty to join India or Pakistan. Jammu and Kashmir were ruled by Hari Singh, a Hindu, at the material time. Instead of joining India or Pakistan, Hari Singh wanted independence for Jammu and Kashmir. However, tribesmen backed by Pakistan invaded Jammu and Kashmir and Hari Singh turned to India for help. India agreed to assist subject to the condition that Jammu and Kashmir acceded to India and that a plebiscite would be held afterwards (however the plebiscite did not happen till today). Hari Singh agreed with the conditions set by India. With the help of Indian troops, Pakistan was defeated and Jammu and Kashmir became a state of India.

The Muslim populations of Kashmir are mainly found in Kashmir Valley. I happened to be in Kashmir Valley on the day of Eid-al-Fitr a few years ago and was fortunate to see the way Eid-al-Fitr was celebrated by Kashmir Muslims. In the morning, religious leaders arrived in a colourful truck at an open field that is tucked among the magnificent mountains and lush greeneries. Men and women from the villages in the vicinity gathered at the open field to listen to the teachings of the religious leaders. Men sat at the front and women at the back. The men and women were separated by a long piece of clothes hung on standing poles on two sides. Children were let to play freely. After the religious leaders finished their speeches, their assistants went around collecting donations from the crowd. The vibrancy of the whole event is truly amazing. 

Eid-al-Fitr is celebrated by Muslims across the world on the first day of Syawal (the 10th month in the Muslim calendar consisting of 12 lunar months in a year of 354 or 355 days). The big day is celebrated by Muslims with much joy and anticipation after completing 29 or 30 days of fasting in the preceding month (Ramadan). 

In the month of Ramadan, Muslims are required to abstain from food and drink from dawn to dusk. Muslims will have a pre-dawn meal called “Suhoor”. At sunset, Muslims traditionally break their fast with a sip of water and some dates. After sunset prayers, a large feast known as ”Iftar” is shared with family and friends. The fast is intended to remind Muslims of the suffering of those less fortunate. 

The exact date of Eid-al-Fitr is not fixed in advance. Eid-al-Fitr is announced if the Eid crescent moon is sighted by the religious authority on the last day of the Ramadan month, otherwise, Eid-al-Fitr shall fall on the following day. On the day of Eid-al-Fitr, Muslims put on new clothes and filled their days with visits to friends’ and relatives’ homes and mosques. Some pay visits to deceased family members’ cemeteries as well. You’ll hear Muslims wishing each other ‘EID MUBARAK’, which means having a blessed day during Eid. 

PhotoJournalism Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Jhargram, India by Sirsendu Gayen from
India, captioned, “The Battle of Life”

There are so many remote villages in the Jhargram district of the Indian state of West Bengal. Villagers of those villages are forced to take risky journeys due to a lack of adequate transportation.

PhotoJournalism Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Kampung Budaya Sunda Sindangbarang, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia by Dede Sopyan Assauri from
Indonesia, captioned, “Hawu – The Traditional Way”

A grandmother is preparing lunch for her little family in the Sundanese cultural village of Sindangbarang, Bogor, West Java, Indonesia, in a simple kitchen filled with traditional kitchen utensils and a traditional clay stove called Hawu.

PhotoJournalism Category June 2021 Finalist, taken in Varanasi, India by Sirsendu Gayen from
India, captioned, “From Roads to Canals”

Citizens were reminded of the mayhem that regularly surrounds urban India at this time, when roads turn into canals even if there is moderate rain, as the monsoon pounded cities. During the monsoon, waterlogging, which is a precursor to urban flooding, is a familiar sight in metropolitan India. As a result of the changing weather pattern, which has resulted in more high-intensity rain in fewer rain days, urban flooding has become more widespread. Cities, which are seen as economic engines, account for more than 65 per cent of the national gross domestic product and employ more than a third of the population. Natural systems have broken down as a result of this increasing urbanization, resulting in collateral damage. However, metropolitan areas generate large amounts of contaminated run-off, which frequently causes the urban drainage system to fail. Even modest rainfall events can cause flash floods in low-lying areas and overwhelm city drainage systems in this situation.

 


 

Congratulations once again to Chan Ee Lin, Sirsendu Gayen and Mohamad Hud Zaqwan for being the Images of Asia (IOA) Monthly Winners for June 2021! You can check out Chan Ee Lin Instagram here, Sirsendu Instagram here and Mohamad Hud Zaqwan Instagram here!

And congratulations to the Images of Asia (IOA) Monthly Finalists for June 2021! You can check out Sirsendu Instagram hereEE Lin Instagram here, Dede Sopyan Assauri, Wong Chee Shiuan, Chen Chit Chuang, Sinsee Ho Instagram here, Zon Hisham Bin Zainal Abidin, Mohamad Hud Zaqwan Instagram here, Nicholas Instagram here and Ayub Mooduto!

Do vote for your favourite photojournalism entry now on the official Asian Geographic’s Facebook and Instagram now! Results out in mid-August.

Follow Asian Geographic’s Instagram for the latest updates.

Love shooting photos of the vast and beautiful Asia? Submit your entries today! More details of Images of Asia Monthly here.

 

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