Saturday, October 19, 2019

The Light of the South Shrine

Two months after the fall of Singapore on the 15th of February 1942, the victorious Japanese began building a Shinto shrine in the forests of the western part of MacRitchie Reservoir in Singapore.
Myanmar , rice wine , Kachin Manaw Festival

Homemade Burmese Booze for Sale

This source of income is so important, households keep their secret recipes closely guarded

Thrilla in Manila

Growing up in a democratic suburb away from the designer labels and the big money of Manila’s central business districts has its benefits.

The Boatbuilders of Tanah Beru: Keeping Seafaring Traditions Alive

(Text by Khong Swee Lin. Photos by Carl-Bernd Kaelig) WORKING round the clock, stevedores trot up and down narrow gangplanks propped between port and deck,...

Bangkok’s Chinese Heritage May Soon Be Bulldozed

The Thai capital's new train line may see the removal of cultural sites including an iconic village of alms bowl makers 

First People of the Arctic

Thousands of years have shaped the lives of the original peoples of the Arctic, true explorers and survivors of one of the world’s most...

Payphones Through the Years

With the advent of mobile phones, public payphones have fallen by the wayside. We take a look back at how they have evolved with...

A Knot in Time

Whether they are tied into place as the weaver's imagination wanders, or aligned in code-like calculations, the minuscule knots of a carpet narrate tales of an ancient craft and those who keep it alive.

Stay connected

226,623FansLike
5,194FollowersFollow
602FollowersFollow

Popular articles

The Starch of Sweet Success

Lush emerald rice paddies provide textural contrast to limpid fish ponds filled with ceaselessly darting pearly carp, attesting to the abundant bounty of the Pearl River Delta, South China’s blessing.
Sepak Takraw , Singapore , Asian Sports

The Uniquely Southeast Asian Sport of Sepak Takraw

Sepak takraw may have been around since the 15th century, but it’s no forgotten relic. Find out more about the history of this fast-growing sport – and its bid for Olympic recognition

Namasté

The Hindu devotee’s hands are pressed together. His palms touch, close to his chest, and his fingers point upwards. His brightly-coloured turban is in stark contrast to his thick white beard. “Namaste,” he says with a slight bow. Literally translated, the word means “I bow to the divine in you.” A respectful greeting, namaste, or namaskar, combined with the wordless hand gesture, conveys the same meaning of acknowledgement for a loved one, a guest or a stranger, regardless of the speaker’s language, culture or religion.