Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Education and Hope: Inheriting a Future

By Karin Ronnow Photos Erik Petersen Wakhan Corridor, Afghanistan – As the teacher led his ninth-grade students through a Dari lesson one summer morning, everyone...

The Sky is Bad Today

Text & photos Rodney Dekker Recurring natural disasters threaten traditional ways of life. On the evening of November 15, 2007, a fierce Category 4 cyclone –...

Homeless, not Shameless

How Japan’s broken economic state destroyed the middle-class haven (Text by Kara Kandarakis and photos by Michael Kandarakis) It was January 10, 2001 at exactly...

Riding the Golden Eagle: From Russia with Love

(Text by Simon Richmond. Photos courtesy of GW Travel) The blue and gold painted Golden Eagle is waiting on platform 8 of Moscow’s Kazan station,...
HIV in Nepal

The Last Frontier

Nepalese migrant workers are most at risk of contracting HIV. Without proper screening and information, this poses a worrying threat for the rest of the population.
cambodian landmines

Unlikely Heroes

The landmines left over from Cambodia's war are being sniffed out and removed by a task force of... trained rats?

Rituals of Remembrance

As the sun sets, a vanguard of boys enters the ceremonial grounds, shouldering large V-shaped objects covered in colourful plastic streamers and bells. They bounce up and down to set a beat while seated onlookers look towards the line of approaching Saisiyat tribespeople. As they begin to flood into the grounds, rocking their bodies as they step in time with the jangling bells, their haunting singing – energetic, but mournful – rises in volume.

Making a Movement

Sharing stories, shunning sushi, or sinking ships: there are many different approaches to environmentalism. On the eve of Sea Shepherd’s 40th anniversary, Aaron “BERTIE” Gekoski caught up with one man who’s adopted a more hands-on approach than most.

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The Starch of Sweet Success

Lush emerald rice paddies provide textural contrast to limpid fish ponds filled with ceaselessly darting pearly carp, attesting to the abundant bounty of the Pearl River Delta, South China’s blessing.

Namasté

The Hindu devotee’s hands are pressed together. His palms touch, close to his chest, and his fingers point upwards. His brightly-coloured turban is in stark contrast to his thick white beard. “Namaste,” he says with a slight bow. Literally translated, the word means “I bow to the divine in you.” A respectful greeting, namaste, or namaskar, combined with the wordless hand gesture, conveys the same meaning of acknowledgement for a loved one, a guest or a stranger, regardless of the speaker’s language, culture or religion.